Author Topic: Newbee introduction  (Read 33379 times)

Offline KKC

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #45 on: April 05, 2016, 07:51:25 AM »
Hey Clean Machine. Welcome.  I'm unfamiliar with this method.  So i'll do some looking into it.  Thanks. But Steve you are saying it can/could incorporate errors?

Offline steve323

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #46 on: April 06, 2016, 01:52:33 PM »
Hi KKC,

The gear cutter from spiralsbysteve relies on starting each cut by manually lining up two lines and rotating the gear blank through the saw blade.  The step is repeated from the left and the right to produce both edges of a tooth.  It seems like this would introduce an error and some teeth may end up slightly wider than others.  I can't see any way to index the position using a dividing head or any other method to achieve perfectly spaced teeth.  They do show what appear to be nicely meshing gears.

Steve

Offline KKC

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #47 on: April 07, 2016, 09:44:17 AM »
Interesting concept.  Sounds like a finger getter too... Indexing would be the trick.

Offline steve323

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #48 on: April 07, 2016, 01:15:39 PM »
Hi KKC,

Your fingers stay near the top so they should be safe on the larger gears.  Smaller pinions might be a different story.

I like the Woodline templates for cutting pinions out of hardwood.  You can start with 3/4" stock and only cut 1/2" deep.  Rip the remaining 1/4" off on the bandsaw.  This keeps the gear firmly attached without having to clean off double sided tape.  One of my future experiments is to try a router pantograph to see if it can be used with 4X sized templates to improve the accuracy even further.

Steve

Offline KKC

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #49 on: April 08, 2016, 05:04:23 AM »
Yeah now that I have found of special interest.  Pantograph looks to have a lot of possibility.  So keep me posted on how you come with that.  As things are starting to warm up I hope to get out to my garage and get my spring cleaning done so I can get started on my clock.  I can't WAIT!!!! I had another idea for my wheels.  Rather than cut out spokes on the inside.  I'm contemplating scrolling patterns that best explain my family.  So... Myself and my boys are Eagle Scouts.  So one wheel's center would have a scouting emblem of some kind scrolled into it. We love fishing so another wheel would have some kind of fishing emblem in it.  And so on.  Kind of make it a legacy clock.

Offline steve323

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #50 on: April 08, 2016, 11:39:39 AM »
It is a great idea to make the gears special for you and your family.  Keep in mind that the end result should be balanced.  Maybe leave some additional wood around the rim that can be sanded off as needed.

One big difference between wood and brass clock gears is the amount of material left after cutting out the spokes.  Brass will not suffer ill effects from normal temperature or humidity variations.  They can leave very thin spokes and still be fully functional for hundreds of years.  The primary objective is to minimize weight.  Wood clock gears have to leave additional material to hold together with humidity changes.

Also keep in mind that the frame can be very elaborate.  It needs solid wood at a few critical points.  Everything else can be carved without any impact on clock functionality.

Steve

Offline KKC

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #51 on: April 13, 2016, 10:01:24 AM »
Those are all good points Steve. I had forgotten balance.  Thanks for reminding me. LOL...

Offline panistefanin

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Re: Newbee introduction
« Reply #52 on: June 05, 2017, 08:03:06 AM »
I would like to read about it anymore. Prompt, what literature to study?
mybestwestern