The Beall Clock Forum

General => Wheels and pinions => Topic started by: pcstru on February 22, 2011, 10:17:02 AM

Title: Maintaining Power
Post by: pcstru on February 22, 2011, 10:17:02 AM
Anyone care to describe, preferably with some drawings, a "maintaining power" mechanism?
Title: Re: Maintaining Power
Post by: Joe Redburn on February 22, 2011, 04:59:50 PM
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maintaining_power>

The search goes on. After a period of inactivity we have pictures of three examples of maintaining power.

Three photos, from Don Fagnan, show aspects of the maintaining power from his Vienna regulator.

Scottie-TX sent photos of the maintaining power from one of his Viennas.

I provided the maintaining power of my Seth Thomas #2.

These photos may be seen at

<http://www.flickr.com/photos/riegelpete/>

That ought to get you started
Regrds
Buckles

Title: Re: Maintaining Power
Post by: jltrent on February 28, 2011, 04:46:47 PM

A good source for general information, including maintaining power, is the book "A Rudimentary Treatise on Clocks, Watches and
Bells", by Edmund Beckett.  An online version can be found at http://www.nawcc-index.net/Articles/17576.pdf (http://www.nawcc-index.net/Articles/17576.pdf)...
Title: Re: Maintaining Power
Post by: pcstru on March 02, 2011, 10:05:57 AM
@joe - thanks. I'd come across those photo's on my search but still couldn't figure it out. Need to think harder I guess!

@jl - that is a simply fantastic resource. Thankyou!
Title: Re: Maintaining Power
Post by: bush2 on September 20, 2011, 05:36:43 AM

A good source for general information, including maintaining power, is the book "A Rudimentary Treatise on Clocks, Watches and
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I get the same problem.I'd come across those photo's on my search but still couldn't figure it out.any more detail about this?
Title: Re: Maintaining Power
Post by: David J. Goodyear on October 03, 2011, 06:46:30 AM
Hi,

I have had the same problem in the past.  There are several resources but without a good explanation they aren't really helpful so here it goes. This is the way that I have constructed it.  My winding barrel is usually attached to the wind arbor via a set screw.  i use a key to wind the arbor which protrudes through the front of the clock.  My assembly goes in order as follows:  winding barrel-ratchet wheel, ratchet clicks-maintaining gear, spring, great wheel. My winding rods are usually 1/4" diameter brass or steel rod.  The great wheel is on a cannon tube which the winding rod slips through with inner diameter of a hair greater than 1/4".  The maintaining gear is on a cannon tube with a inner diameter equal to the great wheel cannon.  I do this so that the friction from the winding rod only affects the whole great wheel/maintain gear assembly instead of each part independently.  The great wheel and maintaining gear are "connected by springs".  Any type of spring will work.  I use a torsion spring. The maintaining gear has the ratchet clicks with ratchet against the wind barrel.  The maintaining gear has to be ratcheted against something fixed so usually a lever/arm is used to ratchet the maintaining gear against the frame of the clock.  So here is what happens when the clock is already wound:  The barrel exerts torque on the ratchet clicks which are attached to the maintaining gear. This turns the maintaining gear.  The spring between the maintaining gear and the  great wheel gets extended/compressed (depending on the type of spring) which exerts and equal torque on the great wheel to turn which drives the rest of the gear train. As the train is moving the maintaining ratchet (attached to the clock frame) rides over the maintaining gear teeth.  Now when the barrel is wound, this takes the pressure off the ratchet clicks attached to the maintaining gear.  Since the maintaining gear is spring loaded against the great wheel, it momentarily starts to turn backwards until one of its teeth come into contact with the maintaining ratchet arm.  When a tooth on the maintaining gear makes contact with the ratchet arm attached to the clock frame, the maintaining gear stops rotating backwards and the spring between the maintaining gear and great wheel exerts torque on the great wheel in the right direction.

It took me quite a bit of time to understand this.  you can use different types of springs.  Different spring will need different implementations.  This website that I found give some good explanation and pictures of a wooden gear clock with a maintaining mechanism driven using extension springs.
http://tempusfugitclocks.blogspot.com/

Hope this helps,

Dave