Recent Posts

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10
1
General Discussion / heattyphedo
« Last post by Orieneidown on July 06, 2015, 07:42:02 PM »
InconrynIbgeorm
http://www.google.com/
SwifiaspTap
2
General Discussion / Creependili
« Last post by Orieneidown on July 05, 2015, 03:47:19 PM »
Moriadryday
http://www.google.com/
DentByncslecync
3
Gallery / Re: Wooden gear clock plans
« Last post by stevenrf on July 04, 2015, 05:36:30 PM »
I have used plans from both Clayton & Brian Law. Both are great sites.I think Brian's plans were easier to work with But I really didn't have any trouble with Clayton's.
4
General Discussion / Re: Antikythera Mechanism
« Last post by steve323 on July 01, 2015, 07:47:28 PM »
Thanks for the update MM,

It is amazing what they were capable of building 2100 years ago.  Even more amazing is that they were able to plan out a gear train with that much complexity just based on observations of the sky.  And all of this was done before telescopes were invented.

Steve
5
General Discussion / Re: Newbee introduction
« Last post by steve323 on July 01, 2015, 07:34:34 PM »
Recently, however, I came across this technique of making involute gear profiles, and have become enamored with it.  The only problem is that my gear teeth are too close together for the table saw blades I have, but there should be some thin-kerf blades available.  I don't have regular access to these tools, so I am just keeping mental notes on what to try once I start building again.

jasc15, you may be able to use a skilsaw blade in your table saw as a cheap way to get a really thin kerf.  Many of the 6.5" to 7.25" diameter blades have a 5/8" hole size and blade widths around 0.07".  I saw this on a woodworking site recently and the consensus was that it is safe.  Table saws spin at a lower RPM than circular saws.  You have to cut slower to make up for the lower RPMs and smaller blade diameter.

Steve
6
Gallery / Re: Wooden gear clock plans
« Last post by jss on June 30, 2015, 05:21:32 PM »
look at the following dxf and plans are available

http://www.woodenclocks.co.uk/

22 or so different clocks
7
Gallery / Wooden gear clock plans
« Last post by wfvalasek on June 28, 2015, 07:18:08 PM »
Do any of you know any good sites for wooden gear clock plans?  I am especially interested in plans that can be run on a CNC machine.  I have just finished Simplicity, one of Clayton plans so I'm familiar with his site.
8
General Discussion / Re: Antikythera Mechanism
« Last post by Mechanism Man on June 24, 2015, 09:47:22 PM »
Hi folks, thanks for the encouraging comments. It's nice to know that there are other shed bound people like me out there who appreciate a gear or two!
Steve - The display outputs from this are many and various. I still have to make up the graphics for them, but this is what I have to achieve:-
On the front (the back of the machine in the photos) there will be a full display that will show the exact position in the sky relative to the constellations of all the planets out to Saturn; the moon (and it's phases); the suns position; and finally the date that the display refers to. The Earth itself isn't featured because the machine shows what can be seen, and where in the sky to look for it, whilst looking out from Earth, so it's more useful than a standard orrery.
On the back - the side which is visible in the photos, there will be two large spiral displays that will be divided into months (235 months for one of them) and will help show when we can expect to see eclipses of the sun or moon, plus three other lesser dials that show other measures of time and adjustment values for the time of day to expect the eclipse - it really is very clever considering it's 2100 years old... In total there are 13 different outputs - or 14 if you count the Moons phase.
if you want to read more have a look at the Antikythera Mechanism on Wikipedia - their page on the machine is brilliant.
Below is a photo of around three quarters of the gears freshly cut - that really was a job and a half...
I'll post more photos as it progresses.
:-)


9
General Discussion / Re: Antikythera Mechanism
« Last post by steve323 on June 24, 2015, 08:04:05 PM »
That is a really incredible looking machine.  I hope you continue to post progress updates, even with the light traffic on this forum.

Are the results shown by the positions of the 3 clack rings?  Or will they eventually end up as hands coming through the brass tubes on the front face?

Is the fastest rotation time equal to a single earth day, so that the positions of the known planets and moon would all be displayed on the front face?

thanks
Steve
10
General Discussion / Re: Newbee introduction
« Last post by jasc15 on June 23, 2015, 07:06:16 PM »
I know lots of folks here on the forum use a band saw for gear cutting, and I had a lot of fun making test gears with my little bandsaw, but the scroll saw just intruges me for some reason.  Hopefully the new scroll saw will help me get motivated to start on a working clock.

I used a cheap scrollsaw myself, but experienced a lot of tearout on the back side of the plywood.  I just dealt with it, and faced those sides to the back of the clock.

Recently, however, I came across this technique of making involute gear profiles, and have become enamored with it.  The only problem is that my gear teeth are too close together for the table saw blades I have, but there should be some thin-kerf blades available.  I don't have regular access to these tools, so I am just keeping mental notes on what to try once I start building again.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 10